City of Calgary Traffic

The issue of speed in residential communities is not a new issue.  It was proposed to the City of Calgary in 2000.  Read the attached link for more information.

CLICK THE FOLLOWING LINK TO DOWNLOAD ORIGINAL PDF DOCUMENT  – City of Calgary Traffic
212128520-CG-09-01-SPC-TTP-Agenda-2000-02-15-Standing-Policy-1

The following is taken from a document presented to the City of Calgary in 2000 and includes the response from the provincial government, also in 2000.  Since that time, Edmonton has imposed their own program for residential speed reduction, Airdrie is 30k throughout and Lacombe engaged in a 30k pilot program as well.

Times have changed.

City of Calgary Traffic from 2000 – Key Points:

  • Provincial Government’s Comments – The Provincial Government was contacted and asked to comment on the feasibility of revising the legislation regarding the unposted 50 km/h standard urban speed limit to 40 km/h. They indicated that while they were reviewing the new Traffic Safety Act and Regulations last year, (this act will replace the Highway traffic Act in 2001), The City of Calgary was the only municipality that had approached them with a written request to lower the unposted speed limit in urban areas to 40 km/h. Therefore, they did not proceed with the revision.
    However, they did indicate that they would re-evaluate this request if the Alberta Urban Municipalities Association (AUMA) would come forward with a letter indicating their support for the proposal.

FINANCIAL IMPACT:

The estimated costs for implementing the three alternatives are as follows:

  • Altemative 1 – Revise the Traffic Safety Act and post “collector” roadways with 50 km/h maximum speed signs. Estimated Cost: – $1 .7 Million . * (if directed by the Province)
  • Altemative 2 – Post all “residential” roadways with 40 km/h maximum speed limit signs – Estimated Cost – $4.3 Million  – (if directed by the City of Calgary)
  • Altemative 3 – Retain the unposted 50 km/h standard urban maximum speed limit as contained in the Traffic Safety Act and Regulations. Estimated Cost – Zero (Nil) – (do nothing, status quo) 

*Note: These estimated costs do not include ongoing sign maintenance and replacement costs. Currently, there has been no funds allocated in the Roads Capital Budget to do the work outlined in the alternatives 1 and 2

CITY OF CALGARY TRAFFIC CONCLUSION :

In the past, the Alberta Government has been reluctant to revise the unposted 50 km/h standard urban maximum speed limit to 40 km/h as specified in the Alberta Highway Traffic Act. This was primarily because The City of Calgary was the only municipality that had approached them with such a request. Recent discussions with the Province have indicated that they would be more receptive to revising the standard urban unposted speed limit to 40 km/h if the AUMA would come forward with a letter indicating support for this initiative.
The result of a survey of 16 municipalities in Canada indicated that two cities; Montreal and Vancouver are in the process of having their provincial legislation revised to reduce the unposted urban maximum speed limit from 50 km/h to 40 km/h.

The engineering facts presented in this report indicate that a 40 km/h maximum speed limit on “residential” roadways is more or less consistent with the desired operating speeds. The spot speed studies conducted on the “residential” roadways indicate that the desired operating speed chosen by most motorists is approximately 40 km/h on residential streets.

This road is an example of City of Calgary Traffic where there are no sidewalks and yet, the speed limit is 50k.

City of Calgary

Royal Ave Calgary

Above is an example of a 50km/hr residential street in Calgary

JAMOREL Media